A Cry For Justice

Awakening the Evangelical Church to Domestic Violence and Abuse in its Midst

Child Abuse: 50 Shades of Lunacy

Matthew 18:5-6 ESV (5)  “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me, (6)  but whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened around his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea.

My wife and I decided to cruise on over to the valley yesterday evening on the motorcycle to find some warmer weather.  Having succeeded (it was some 25 degrees warmer than at our house), we stopped at a little Mexican restaurant and sat outside on the patio to eat.  It turned out to be one of those times when you are blessed with hearing the conversations at the next table whether you want to or not.  (Loud cell-phone talkers bug me too, right?  That’s another story).

Anyway, here is this group of maybe 8 adults, men and women, and a young girl, maybe about 12.  Sure enough – and nowadays you can just about know it’s coming – the conversation turned to Fifty Shades of Gray (Ida Mae recently said that as many “Christians” as are reading this thing, maybe they think it is about defective laundry detergent?).  There was the usual nonsense about how wonderful this series of books is, and one guy whose alcohol consumption had made his mouth run ahead of his brain, told the women at the table how much their husbands would like it if the women read 50 Shades.

And then the women got on board.  They ranted about how great this thing is.  Then, get this, the mother of the girl – with the girl sitting right next to her – said “Yeah, I ordered that on Kindle.  Oh right, I need to get that deleted from ______’s Kindle.  Insert the girl’s name in the blank.

By the time we finished our burrito con pollo, the table’s topic had turned to even more edifying subjects.  With the girl still there, another of the women started expounding on the wonders of some game that is “definitely only for adults.”

What is that little girl in for in her life?  Is there any reason that we should think that the Lord would not consider all of this to be child abuse?

I told my wife that I would be happy to stand up and chew on them all for awhile, but people like this are beyond the reason of words and common sense.  We left them to their third topic: why gin is better than tequila.  Deep.  Really deep.

5 Comments

  1. Yes. Some people might think that a child of twelve wouldn’t necessarily take much notice of that kind of adult conversation, but I am pretty sure it would be polluting her mind if her mind is not already so deeply polluted that it would make little difference.
    If a child has any yearning for virtue, nobility, or even plain old love and respect, but is surrounded by adults who are so focused on lust, their hopes will shrivel; they must feel only trepidation and fear for their future. And the demon of lust will be grabbing them too, before long, unless the Lord protects or rescues them.
    I’ve never forgotten the time at our holiday house when I overheard a man whose family had a holiday house in the same block as ours (we were holiday-friends, but not friends the rest of the year) commented to my father about my older sister’s budding breasts. She was about 12. I felt sick; and what was most sickening was the way my father did not tell the man off, but went along with it, even though I’m sure my father didn’t like what the other man had said. These things wound deep in the soul of a child. I was about 10 at the time.

  2. Sadly, Jeff, that the extent of child abuse is so horrendously evil that this conversation you overheard would be minimized completely by any agency formed to protect the children. That little girl was sexualized by that conversation. She wasn’t even protected by her mother. I can imagine you just wanting to come out of your seat in the hopes of giving those adults a piece of your mind, but you probably would be the one arrested. We’ll all be praying for that child.

  3. Interesting post. What worries even me more, though, is the attitude of the adults about the book. I read the first one and my belief is that it actually promotes domestic violence. It’s painted as a book about a woman who wants to be in bondage, so everything’s ostensibly cool about this arrangement. That is not, however, how it really comes across. I only know how the first book ends, which was somewhat redemptive. But since there are two more books (which I don’t intend to read), I can probably guess how the story ends. I just found this article, so apparently I’m not the only one who is incredibly disturbed by the book’s premise: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/27/fifty-shades-of-grey-burning_n_1833457.html.

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