A Cry For Justice

Awakening the Evangelical Church to Domestic Violence and Abuse in its Midst

Tag Archives: interpreting Scripture

The Bible has one law for unintentional sin, and another law for intentional sin

The Bible makes a distinction between unintentional sin and intentional sin. This is important when we consider how we, as Christians, are to respond to domestic abusers. The distinction is set out in the Law which Moses gave to the people of Israel. Numbers 15:22-31, NKJ – Laws Concerning Unintentional Sin If you sin unintentionally, and do …

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Judging, Specks, and Logs — sermon by Ps Jeff Crippen

Judging, Specks, and Logs Matthew 7:1-6 ESV Ps. Jeff Crippen Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice …

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Jesus in his love for us, laid himself on the altar.

I am learning Who Jesus is on a personal Christian – not ‘c’hristian – basis. I am still missing the heart connection, trying to get past the non-stop force-feeding details of His suffering for my sake, so I better be grateful!! The sugary-sweet imagery of Easy Believism. Oh, yes. And He loves me and is …

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The one flesh covenant and divorce. In domestic abuse, divorce is NOT the worse possible outcome

The one flesh covenant is often broken in this fallen world:— A grievously mistreats B by a pattern of conduct or by one instance of adultery and thereby A breaks the one flesh covenant. Then B is free to divorce because the covenant is already broken. #ChurchDV #Churchtoo #notmysin is a good hashtag for victims …

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Whose tears are covering the altar in Malachi 2? The Matthew Bible vs. the Geneva Bible, Puritans and Calvin

Now have ye brought it to this point again, that the altar of the Lord is covered with tears, weeping, and mourning: so that I will no more regard the meat offering, neither will I receive nor accept anything at your hands. And yet ye say, wherefore [why]? Even because that whereas the Lord made …

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Why did Paul call abused women ‘little-women’?

Paul was most likely conveying that abused women deserve sympathy and empathy for the underserved suffering they have endured. Paul was probably indicating that we ought to feel compassion for these women, recognising that they worthy and good people, but relatively powerless and weak against the crafty tactics of abusers and their allies. In his …

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